Thursday, November 13, 2014

They Should Offer a College Course Or Something For This.

All I wanted to do was take out the trash.

But the dumpster was three apartment buildings over, and it was 30 degrees out, and I knew I couldn't leave the sleeping newborn in the crib, because the whole place would inevitably burn down in the four minutes it took me to return. But he was sleeping. And the doctor had said not to take him out in public until he was 2 months old.

I bundled him up, awkwardly carried him with two bags of trash across the parking lot, and [thankfully] tossed the correct two out of three into the dumpster.


Anyway, parenthood's proven more a learned skill than an intuition of wisdom. I thought getting pregnant came with a blast of holy pixie dust, and whatever virtue it is that kept Mary from yelling at Joseph for falling asleep at the Nativity. 


The logistics of every day life and kids should be a course in college. A legit course, not some joke elective for those of us pursuing the MRS degree plan. (Yeah, I'll own up to that, as well as admit it was the dumbest use of college funds ever, perhaps secondary only to being a Communication Studies major. No, for real.)

Raising Kids could be a logic course for philosophy credit: is it more ethical to cut your grocery list in half and leave the store with a crying toddler, or just forge on, to the annoyance of other shoppers? What if it's two crying toddlers? What if it's the day before your husband's birthday and cutting your losses means no chocolate in the brownies?

Or it could be a dual credit course for statistics: discuss the probability that your three-year-old is actually having an emergency and must pee on a tree right off the sidewalk, or is just faking it, because peeing on trees is the coolest new skill in his set. (There's something about yuppy suburban bike trails that pushes preschoolers and pseudo-pro cyclists alike to want to show off.)

Then there's the logistics of having kids. Why are we even doing this? There are costs to consider. Sure you might be able to afford diapers today, but what about driver's ed, car insurance, college?! (Our four-year-old attends part-time Catholic preschool that's somehow four-freakin'-thousand dollars a school year. It's hard for me to grasp spending that much per year per kid on education, even though it's on the low end for private schools. Except now that I've used the F-word euphemism as a tuition descriptor, we might not be invited back. Problem solved.)

I've heard that caring for children is a way to holiness -- just as any vocation or life-calling, but I expected a kind of innate and instant holiness. It turns out that tiny, needy babies bring out my worst, and I'm not the calm, cheerful, easy-going, generous, thoughtful woman I can make myself out to be. (Fact: I'm super grumpy. Like, humorless to the core. Except with coffee, when I can at least muster up enough goodwill for dry witless wit about TMZ being the only real news source in America.)


Picture Source
But even with kids revealing my worst, they're also bringing out my best. Our utter unpreparedness humbled me with our first baby. The health needs and care for our second baby emboldened me. The subsequent surprise of twins has caused me to abandon all pretense and search out our intentions and second-guess our expectations.

Everyone's striving for something better, to have a better life than our parents, that our kids will have a better life than us. But what do we mean by "a better life"? More stuff from Ikea? More prestige in our work titles? More house in our homes? I don't think most parents mean any of this. We mean happiness. We want our kids to be happy, and we fill their lives with all kinds of opportunity, experience, and stuff to make it happen.

A line from my favorite Rich Mullins' song keeps relaying through my mind -- "they worked to give faith hands and feet, and somehow gave it wings," alongside images of his family of seven in a car that seats five, and a line down the hall for the single bathroom in their house. But they were happy. 

And I'm reminded there's really no preparing for any of this. And man, it's not exactly the life we planned, but it's so, so much better. 




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